Advanced Search
E-store

RELEASES

From All Purity CD

Indian

From All Purity CD
CD
Guiltless (Gatefold)

Indian

Guiltless (Gatefold)
LP
From All Purity LP *Bone White*

Indian

From All Purity LP *Bone White*
LP
Guiltless CD

Indian

Guiltless CD
CD

Indian

Chicago’s blackened noise nihilists return to scene with their fifth full length album ‘From All Purity’. On ‘From All Purity’ Indian take their infamously hateful aggression to new levels of despair. Now augmented with an even keener sense of harsh noise, all the trademark elements of Indian’s sound have been refined to reach new lows of powerful and punishing anguish. This is the opposite of easy listening.

Formed in 2003, the band's debut EP, God Slave, was a self-released mission statement, welcoming the band into the world like young, kicking, screaming giants. Following this release, Indian’s first three records – The Unquiet Sky, Slights and Abuse, and The Sycophant, respectively – were all issued through Portland, OR based metal label Seventh Rule Recordings. Each of these releases found the band gaining momentum and attracting followers, as well as performing shows with bands such as Wolves in the Throne Room, Locrian, and Agalloch.

After being signed to Relapse Records in 2010, Indian began to diligently craft their third full-length, knowing that, this time around, all eyes were on them. Not only did the band live up to their fans’ lofty expectations, but they also achieved a massive critical breakthrough. Guiltless was released in 2011 to rave reviews. The Chicagoist described the album as “a musical journey into the mouth of teeth-rattling metal madness,” while Metal Hammer simply called it “pretty much an essential album.”

Fans were also impressed, gathering to soak up the band’s feverish rays of doom on tour across the country. The band performed shows with High on Fire, Batillus, and Yob, translating their recorded sounds into a murky, devilish live show. Such performances confirmed Indian as one of the most exciting metal acts making music today, recalling an era in which the genre felt truly new, bursting with energy and untapped potential. Or, as Revolver puts it, “Nothing has sounded more genuinely evil and distressing in a long time.” All hail Indian.